Machine Learning quiz – part 1 of 3

Introduction

I’ve been meaning to write about the 2016 SEG Machine Learning Contest for some time. I am thinking of a short and not very structured series (i.e. I’ll jump all over the place) of 2, possibly 3 posts (with the exclusion of this quiz). It will mostly be a revisiting – and extension – of some work that team MandMs (Mark Dahl and I) did, but not necessarily posted. I will touch most certainly on cross-validation, learning curves, data imputation, maybe a few other topics.

Background on the 2016 ML contest

The goal of the SEG contest was for teams to train a machine learning algorithm to predict rock facies from well log data. Below is the (slightly modified) description of the data form the original notebook by Brendon Hall:

The data is originally from a class exercise from The University of Kansas on Neural Networks and Fuzzy Systems. This exercise is based on a consortium project to use machine learning techniques to create a reservoir model of the largest gas fields in North America, the Hugoton and Panoma Fields. For more info on the origin of the data, see Bohling and Dubois (2003) and Dubois et al. (2007).

This dataset is from nine wells (with 4149 examples), consisting of a set of seven predictor variables and a rock facies (class) for each example vector and validation (test) data (830 examples from two wells) having the same seven predictor variables in the feature vector. Facies are based on examination of cores from nine wells taken vertically at half-foot intervals. Predictor variables include five from wireline log measurements and two geologic constraining variables that are derived from geologic knowledge. These are essentially continuous variables sampled at a half-foot sample rate.

The seven predictor variables are:

The nine discrete facies (classes of rocks) are:

For some examples of the work during the contest, you can take a look at the original notebook, one of the submissions by my team, where we used Support Vector Classification to predict the facies, or a submission by the one of the top 4 teams, all of whom achieved the highest scores on the validation data with different combinations of Boosted Trees trained on augmented features alongside the original features.

QUIZ

Just before last Christmas, I run a little fun experiment to resume work with this dataset. I decided to turn the outcome into a quiz.

Below I present the predicted rock facies from two distinct models, which I call A and B. Both were trained to predict the same labeled facies picked by the geologist, which are shown on the left columns (they are identical) of the respective model panels. The right columns in each panels are the predictions. Which predictions are “better”?

Please be warned, the question is a trick one. As you can see, I am gently leading you to make a visual, qualitative assessment of “better-ness”, while being absolutely vague about the models and not giving any information about the training process, which is intentional, and – yes! – not very fair. But that’s the whole point of this quiz, which is really a teaser to the series.

2 responses to “Machine Learning quiz – part 1 of 3

  1. Pingback: Machine Learning quiz – part 2 of 3 | MyCarta·

  2. Pingback: Machine Learning quiz – part 3 of 3 | MyCarta·

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